Protected Areas

These four areas were recently protected:

Sagebrush Slopes (protected 2012)

Sparrow Grasslands (protected 2012)

South Block (protected 2014)

Kit Carr (protected 2015)

Consider reading this January 2015 document called “Summary of Protected Area Designations and Activities” http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/aboutBCParks/summary-of-pa-designations&activities.pdf

More newly-protected areas:

Protected Areas Of British Columbia Amendment Act, 2015 https://www.leg.bc.ca/40th4th/1st_read/gov08-1.htm

The following areas have been protected for many years:

South Okanagan Grasslands Protected Area http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/s_ok_grassland/

White Lake Grasslands Protected Area http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/wht_lk_grass/

The Federal Government of Canada also does a pretty good job protecting areas without designating them as a “National Park”.  The Vaseux-Bighorn National Wildlife Area is already protected and is part of the proposed National Park https://www.ec.gc.ca/ap-pa/default.asp?lang=En&n=227DE036-1

https://www.ec.gc.ca/ap-pa/227DE036-AD4E-4599-8B20-0740A988B150/Vaseux-Bighorn-National-Wildlife-Area_eng.pdf

https://www.ec.gc.ca/ap-pa/42BBCCB5-E1C8-4161-AB57-09A1295EAC6B/Vaseux-Bighor_NWA_PLT.pdf

Here’s a link for federally-protected areas in BC https://www.ec.gc.ca/ap-pa/default.asp?lang=En&n=0D0A02C4-1

Mankind and Mother Nature both impact nature positively and negatively.  As of today, August 20th, wildfires rage near Oliver, Osoyoos, Midway, Rock Creek and Greenwood.  Homes, businesses, livestock, RV’s, parkland and undoubtedly wildlife have succumbed to the flames.  First Nations believe that wildfires happen “when the land is sick”.  Humankind has a responsibility to protect the planet so there is something left for future generations.

The truth needs to be considered.

Currently, much of the proposed national park area is already protected in one way or another.  Years before the 2012 CPAWS roadshow, local ranchers, farmers, politicians, business people, concerned citizens and provincial ministries drafted regulations to protect the wilderness that might otherwise comprise the national park.  They did it because they care, and they did it because ranching and wildnerness go hand in hand. Google “Biodiversity Ranching”.

More than a dozen laws and regulations – many of which are 10, 20 or 30 pages long – have been referenced on this website for your reading pleasure. The strength and number of regulations that ranchers must follow when they put their cattle out on crown land for grazing is no small feat.